Long Beach, CA
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File #: 20-1174    Version: 1 Name: PRM - CSULB for Right-of Entry for Colorado Lagoon
Type: Contract Status: CCIS
File created: 11/16/2020 In control: City Council
On agenda: 12/8/2020 Final action: 12/8/2020
Title: Recommendation to authorize City Manager, or designee, to execute a Right-of-Entry Permit, and any necessary amendments, with California State University Long Beach, to enter the Colorado Lagoon and Marine Stadium to conduct academic research on biological resources and perform monitoring activities, for an initial three-year term, with the option to renew for one additional two-year period, at the discretion of the City Manager. (District 3)
Sponsors: Parks, Recreation and Marine
Attachments: 1. 120820-C-22sr&att.pdf
Related files: P-00241_000
TITLE
Recommendation to authorize City Manager, or designee, to execute a Right-of-Entry Permit, and any necessary amendments, with California State University Long Beach, to enter the Colorado Lagoon and Marine Stadium to conduct academic research on biological resources and perform monitoring activities, for an initial three-year term, with the option to renew for one additional two-year period, at the discretion of the City Manager. (District 3)

DISCUSSION
On June 16, 2015, the City Council authorized a Right-of-Entry Permit (Permit No. P-00037) with California State University Long Beach (CSULB), to enter the Colorado Lagoon and Marine Stadium to engage in research activities to ascertain fish foraging behavior, migration patterns, and utilization of culverts to access estuarine habitat. CSULB researchers assessed to what extent fish were able to transit the 880-foot-long culvert connecting Alamitos Bay to Colorado Lagoon to access new habitat. Their findings (Attachment A) that the culvert and grate did pose a movement barrier for some fish species at all times of day, and for other fish species at certain tide times of day, were shared with the City and helped guide decisions about ongoing restoration plans for the Colorado Lagoon and supported continuing water quality monitoring activities.

CSULB researchers have requested to engage in further study at these locations to build on previous results and understand the impacts of the planned culvert removal as the Colorado Lagoon Open Channel Restoration Project continues. The objective of the study is to determine how the habitat is affected by the culvert removal and how several economically important fish species (including Round Stingray, California Halibut, Yellowfin Croaker, and Grey Smoothhound) can utilize this newly restored urban lagoon habitat. Researchers are seeking grants from various agencies to fund the study.

To support the research, a new Right-of-Entry Permit will be required to evaluat...

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