Long Beach, CA
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File #: 13-0156    Version: 1 Name: DS-PW-Civic Center
Type: Agenda Item Status: Approved
File created: 2/8/2013 In control: City Council
On agenda: 2/12/2013 Final action: 2/12/2013
Title: Recommendation to receive and file a presentation on seismic deficiencies of the Civic Center, and authorize City Manager to release a Request for Qualifications for the development, construction and operation of a new Civic Center. (District 2)
Sponsors: Development Services, Public Works
Attachments: 1. 021213-NB-11sr&att.pdf, 2. 021213-NB-11 Presentation from Mike Conway.pdf, 3. 021213-NB-11 Jon Sommers.pdf
Related files: 13-0921
TITLE
Recommendation to receive and file a presentation on seismic deficiencies of the Civic Center, and authorize City Manager to release a Request for Qualifications for the development, construction and operation of a new Civic Center. (District 2)

DISCUSSION
In May 2007, the Department of Public Works presented findings of a study, which identified the seismic deficiencies of the existing Long Beach City Hall building. The study concluded that the “seismic only” retrofit of City Hall would cost $50 million (in 2006 dollars) to complete. However, a seismic renovation would require building code and systems upgrades to the facility, and would increase the cost to approximately $80 million. In addition to the costs associated with upgrading the building, all staff housed in the City Hall facility would be required to be relocated offsite during the construction period. This relocation, estimated for three years, along with design soft costs would add an additional expense of $39 million, bringing the financial investment of upgrading City Hall to approximately $170 million (in 2013 dollars) for a building that is over 40 years old and suffers from functional and technical obsolescence. In addition to City Hall, the City maintains leases for approximately 112,500 square feet of additional office space throughout the City at an annual cost of $2.14 million, which could be relocated back to the Civic Center if additional space were provided.

A key component of the Civic Center is the Main Library, which has also suffered decades of maintenance challenges, including an inability to correct waterproofing defects that have resulted in near-constant water leakage. It also suffers significant deficiencies in building systems and is wholly inefficient in its use of space.

Separately, the former Redevelopment Agency structured a transaction with the State of California to jumpstart the construction of the new George Deukmejian Courthouse. At the same time, the for...

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