Long Beach, CA
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File #: 20-0157    Version: 1 Name: CD1 - Food Truck Regulations
Type: Agenda Item Status: Approved
File created: 2/10/2020 In control: City Council
On agenda: 2/18/2020 Final action: 2/18/2020
Title: Recommendation to request City Manager prepare an analysis of the possible options for increased regulation of food trucks, and enforcement mechanisms, and report back to City Council within 90 days.
Sponsors: COUNCILWOMAN MARY ZENDEJAS, FIRST DISTRICT
Attachments: 1. 021820-R-15sr.pdf
TITLE
Recommendation to request City Manager prepare an analysis of the possible options for increased regulation of food trucks, and enforcement mechanisms, and report back to City Council within 90 days.

DISCUSSION
Food trucks have long been an important part of Southern California culture, and provide a popular amenity and culinary opportunity for many Long Beach residents, especially after normal restaurant hours have ended, at festivals and special events, and at work sites not served by brick and mortar businesses.

In 2011, recognizing the increasing popularity of food trucks, the City Council adopted legislation enacting regulations on them, hoping both to support the continued presence of food trucks in Long Beach as an amenity for residents and visitors, and also to regulate them appropriately to avoid an undue impact on residential neighborhoods, brick and mortar restaurants and cafes, and street and sidewalk transit.

Since that time, food trucks have been a common sight in Long Beach, with both positive and negative impacts. While residents enjoy having access to a variety of cuisines at places and times not usually served by brick and mortar businesses, food trucks have also located close to restaurants at times, creating a perception that brick and mortar businesses may be losing customers to food trucks which, free of many of the permitting and licensing requirements restaurants face, can often offer lower prices for the same fare. There is also a perception that the trucks do not always comply with regulations, for example the requirement that a bathroom is available to the public within a short distance.

The City should not seek to eliminate food trucks from the economic landscape in Long Beach, but does have an obligation to consider and minimize any negative impact on local businesses. Some adjustments to the regulations governing food trucks, such as those regulating their proximity to business entrances, their permittable hours of operati...

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