Long Beach, CA
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File #: 12-0304    Version: 1 Name: CD-5,8 - monofilament recovery
Type: Agenda Item Status: Approved
File created: 4/5/2012 In control: City Council
On agenda: 4/17/2012 Final action: 4/17/2012
Title: Recommendation to, by motion of the City Council, refer to the Parks and Recreation Commission and the Marine Advisory Committee, the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Project for possible expansion to all areas where fishing is allowed in Long Beach and to encourage a partnership with the Aquarium of the Pacific in developing an educational program on this issue.
Sponsors: COUNCILWOMAN GERRIE SCHIPSKE, FIFTH DISTRICT, COUNCILWOMAN RAE GABELICH, EIGHTH DISTRICT
Attachments: 1. 041712-R-23sr.pdf, 2. 041712-R-23-Handout G Earl.pdf
TITLE
Recommendation to, by motion of the City Council, refer to the Parks and Recreation Commission and the Marine Advisory Committee, the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Project for possible expansion to all areas where fishing is allowed in Long Beach and to encourage a partnership with the Aquarium of the Pacific in developing an educational program on this issue.
 
DISCUSSION
Councilwoman Gerrie Schipske established a Lakes, Ponds and Wetlands Task Force in 2007 to address residents' concerns about the need for stewardship of the wildlife, birds, fish and water fowl, as well as the lakes and parks which support them, in Long Beach. As part of the work of the task force, the members have done lake clean ups in El Dorado park and routinely walked the lakes to retrieve fishing line and tackle, which has been left behind and which unfortunately has injured rare birds.
 
Members of the Lakes, Ponds, and Wetlands Task Force have also raised concerns about the impact of fishing line and tackle left at other fishing spots in Long Beach such as the piers, docks and marinas.
 
With the assistance of the Department of Parks, Recreation and Marine and Berkeley Pure Fishing (a fishing supply company), a "Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Project (MRRP)" was launched at the fishing lake in El Dorado Park.   This project includes the placement of recycling tubes near where fishing takes place so that monofilament line and tackle can be discarded and then sent to Berkeley Pure Fishing and recycled. The monofilament line is recycled into plastic pellets and turned into fishing tackle boxes.
 
The original project was started in the State of Florida (www.fishinglinerecycling.org <http://www.fishinglinerecycling.org>) but also includes placement of recycling tubes and educational signs at lakes, piers, docks and marinas. It is also supported by www.Boatus.com <http://www.Boatus.com> and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) (<http://marinedebris.noaa.gov/projects/boatus.html>).
 
These efforts are innovative projects dedicated to reducing the environmental damage caused by discarded fishing line. Monofilament fishing line lasts up to 600 years in the environment where it entangles wildlife, is eaten by animals including birds, fish, and sea turtles, and is hazardous to boaters and swimmers.
 
MRRP strives to decrease the negative impacts of monofilament fishing line left in the environment by conducting regular cleanups and by encouraging anglers to recycle their used fishing line at tackle shops and outdoor bins.
 
Expansion of MRRP to Include Salt Water Fishing Locations in Long Beach
 
Because the City of Long Beach has both fresh and salt water fishing locations, the birds, fish and waterfowl are at risk for entanglement and other hazards resulting from improperly discarded fishing line and tackle.
 
It is the recommendation of the Task Force based upon the success of the MRRP at El Dorado Lake that this project be expanded (recycling tubes and educational signage) to include the city's piers, docks and marinas - making Long Beach a leader in California in this important environmental effort.
 
Furthermore, because of the interest of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the effort of removing discarded fishing line and tackle and the relationship of the Aquarium of the Pacific with NOAA, it would be of great benefit if the City's Park, Recreation and Marine Department work with the Aquarium to develop an appropriate educational program on this issue.
 
FISCAL IMPACT
The fishing line recycle tubes can be obtained from Boat US Foundation at no cost or constructed by volunteers for @$25 each. Signage and labels for the recycling tubes are also available at minimal cost or can be printed in-house.
 
SUGGESTED ACTION
Approve recommendation.
 
Respectfully Submitted,
COUNCILWOMAN GERRIE SCHIPSKE
FIFTH DISTRICT
 
COUNCILWOMAN RAE GABELICH
EIGHTH DISTRICT